• yet, another stop on the road: from site specific to social specific – 11 Februari

    Artist talk with Rainer Oldendorf, who will discuss his practice as an artist and filmmaker, emphazising his methodology and and the storylines that his work sets in motion.

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    Saturday 11 February 2017 // 17h-19h doors and bar open at 16h30

    LaCocina@Goleb Burgemeester de Vlugtlaan 125 - 1063 BJ Amsterdam www.lacocinaarchive.info www.goleb.nl follow us on Facebook   La Cocina@Goleb: another stop on the road that German artist and filmmaker Rainer Oldendorf has been following for almost 30 years. Inviting us to delve into some key moments in his artistic production, Oldendorf will guide us through a journey that somehow started in the suburban city of Ivry-sur-Seine in 1994, and which will soon take him to Athens and Kassel later this year. yet, another stop on the road: from site specific to social specific _with Rainer Oldendorf

    “To arrive at a solution even in the political problem, the road of aesthetics must be pursued, because it is through beauty that we arrive at freedom.”

    – Friedrich von Schiller, Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man

    Almost three decades ago, Rainer Oldendorf moved to Ivry-sur-Seine, in the South of Paris, and established himself for a year in a complex designed in the early 1970s by architects Gailhoustet and Renaudie, and considered at the time as a flagship for the renewal of architecture in France. In Ivry, the artist developed a film project for which he invited 14 couples from the neighborhood to reenact a sequence from Fassbinder’s participation in the 1978 collective film Germany in Autumn. In the sequence, we see Fassbinder and Armin Meier, his partner at the time, in the apartment where they lived. The couple enters into a dispute over the terrorist crisis affecting the country, and the official state position regarding the situation. The dispute eventually evolves into a domestic and timeless political metaphor of the social and ethical responsibility resonating all through the public fabric. Le Centre d’Ivry (1994) is a landmark in Oldendorf’s artistic endeavour: bringing together the artist’s obsession with architecture and his passion for cinema, the film installation not only investigates the way how history and politics are felt in an intimate manner, but also unravels the nuanced legacy of the modern project. Le Centre d’Ivry echoes in many ways with the work that the artist is currently developing, and which unfolds in the cities of Besançon, Athens and Kassel. Taking as his point of departure research on the boat trip from Marseille to Athens, which participants of the 4th International Congress of Modern Architecture (CIAM 4) undertook in 1933, and which was filmed by Moholy-Nagy, the artist sets sail for uncharted destinations. Together with students, artists, researchers, and amateur actors, he starts a journey across the Mediterranean sea, and casts off for a collective "dérive" that ultimately unravels a certain shipwreck. The promises of progress and modern life become the horizon on which certain endeavors, even when paved with good intentions, end up unexpectedly stranded. With this first public event in La Cocina’s Cycle 2 Tales of Incompleteness, we wish to discuss the way how strategies of the unresolved, unfinished, ongoing, and the fictional, can have a productive collision with “continuity,” a term often used to describe Oldendorf’s work. Continuity is here to be understood as a movement that connects and articulates past and future, creating a flux that affects as well the space and living experience: since we always come from a place, and we are always on the way to another place.   About the artist: From 1977 to 1983, Rainer Oldendorf participated in the “Free Cinema” in Lörrach, an alternative cinema that screens and produces experimental film. His interest in appropriation and use of cinema dates from this period. His practice includes film, video, photography, architecture, and light, and reflects on personal, historical, and political aspects of his own past, developed in the specific contexts in which he produces his work and in collaboration with the individuals involved in each project. Rainer Oldendorf lives and works in Lörrach, Germany and Besançon, France. Read an essay on the artist’s work, by Nuria Enguita Mayo Conceptually modelled after a kitchen, La Cocina_ aims to create a place of encounter and dialogue where dissonant, provocative, poetic and sometime incongruous viewpoints can be shared, negotiated, and nurtured. Implemented in Goleb, an artist-run space based in Amsterdam-West, La Cocina_ entails two concomitant endeavours: an ongoing intervention in the interior design of Goleb’s project space that will be inspired by our guests through exchange and dialogue; and a public program that explores the notion of agonism through diverse artistic and discursive practices. a project initiated by Lore Gablier and Alejandro Ramírez in collaboration with architect Andrés Novo with the participation of Goleb    La Cocina_ is supported by AFK–Amsterdam Fonds voor de Kunst, the Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds, and Urban Resort

    L’Échiqueté as a chess tournament at Goleb – 13th November

    Sunday 13th November - 2016

    @GOLEB // Burgemeester de Vlugtlaan 125, Amsterdam

    La Cocina is inviting you to a chess tournament with a twist _

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    7 tables, 12 players, checkered pieces and weaved boards, a performance by Urok Shirhan, a forgotten story by Antoine Deul, comments by Markha Valenta, a conspiracy room with Patrick Bernier & Olive Martin… and also awards, food and drinks to share among peers, friends and family...

    Through the tournament, we will dive into "L'Échiqueté," a trickered version of the chess game created by French artists duo Olive Martin & Patrick Bernier.

    "L'Échiqueté" was inspired by a photograph from the Bernier family archives depicting a ceremony celebrating the constitution of Niger’s Armed Forces and the commemoration of the first anniversary of the Republic of Niger in 1961. This event followed the signing, a few months earlier, of a defence agreement between France and what are now Burkina-Faso and Benin. The agreement stipulated that the French republic would provide material aid and would also allocate troops to help these countries to form their own national armies. In exchange, France would be granted free access to military infrastructures and – in an annex that remained a state secret for years – privileged access to strategic resources such as oil, gas, and uranium.

    The martial configuration of the scene, the distribution of elements within it, as well as the black-and-white attire of the key protagonists, have here been translated into a chessboard diagram and a variation of chess called “L’Échiqueté,” or checkered chess. The rules are the same as for traditional chess. But the artists introduce a new rule, which completely turns the “black-and-white” dichotomy of chess on its head: when a piece is captured, it merges with that of its captor, thus producing a new, black and white “checkered” piece.

    The players are forced to reconsider the original tactics of the game: how, for example, to deal with a situation in which it is not possible to capture a menacing piece because it belongs to us as well as to our opponent. Or what to think of the fact that in the course of the game, a third player, as an independent opponent, may take charge of the checkered pieces, as the pieces do not really belong to anyone. The work is a clever détournement of traditional oppositional game strategy as well as a sophisticated metaphor on identity politics and related issues of métissage, or intermixing, hybridity, and alterity. It challenges a polarized view of the world as “black and white” and suggests a different way of negotiating opposition.

    * Program:

    2:30PM Open doors.

    3:00PM Short Introduction by ‘La Cocina’   

    -// Performance by Urok Shirhan

    -// First round: traditional speed chess.

    -// -Conspiracy room: preparing the third players  (a)historical narration by Patrick & Olive.

    -// Second round: L'Échiqueté speed chess with an interruption  by Antoine Deul ‘The forgotten history’

    -//  Final round: L'Échiqueté without time restrictions and commented by Markha Valenta

    6:30PM Awards ceremony + Dinner & Drinks

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    About our guests:

    Patrick Bernier & Olive Martin

    The collaborative practice of Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin combines writing, performance, installation, photography, and film. Their work centers on issues of hospitality and hosting, and explores the fluctuating, porous nature of identity in the postcolonial, migratory context.

    Antoin Deul is chair person of Ninsee – National Institute for the Study of Dutch Slavery and Legacy. He is a public speaker addressing issues like racial equality. He also is a water scientist and an environmental activist.

    Urok Shirhan (NL/IQ) holds an MA in Visual Cultures from Goldsmiths University, London and a BFA from the Gerrit Rietveld Academy, Amsterdam. In 2012/2013 she was a fellow at Ashkal Alwan in Beirut, Lebanon. Her work deals with the politics of image-making and the (sometimes violent) legacies that are perpetuated through visible and invisible representations. Working mainly with video and text, her research at the Jan van Eyck Academie has further explored the performative aspects of her practice.

    Markha Valenta

    Markha Valenta lives in Amsterdam and works at Radboud University Nijmegen. Her current work concerns the politics of religion and culture in global cities, international relations and secular democracies, with a focus on north America, western Europe, and India. A corresponding concern of the last decade has been the accommodation and discrimination of Muslim minorities in secular democracies since 9/11. She has also worked for the Scientific Council for Government Policy and is a regular participant in Dutch debates on these issues.

    Conceptually modelled after a kitchen, “La Cocina” aims to create a place of encounter and dialogue where dissonant, provocative, poetic and sometime incongruous viewpoints can be shared, negotiated, and nurtured.

    Implemented in Goleb, an artist-run space based in Amsterdam-West, “ La Cocina ” entails two concomitant endeavours: an ongoing intervention in the interior design of Goleb’s project space that will be inspired by our guests through exchange and dialogue; and a public program that explores the notion of agonism through diverse artistic and discursive practices.

    A project initiated by Lore Gablier and Alejandro Ramírez

    In collaboration with Mirko Lazović, Igor Sevcuk & Goleb community

    And with the participation of architect Andrés Novo

    "La Cocina" is supported by AFK (Amsterdams Fonds voor de Kunst) and sponsored by Urban Resort